PEP LOVE

PEP LOVE

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With Pep Love's intricate raps, indelible performances and hard-hitting beats in addition to Hieroglyphics albums Third Eye Vision and Full Circle, Pep has amassed a highly... read more
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Biography

With Pep Love’s intricate raps, indelible performances and hard-hitting beats in addition to Hieroglyphics albums Third Eye Vision and Full Circle, Pep has amassed a highly-respected, musical catalog through adaptation and consistency.

Growing up in a musically and socially informed family Pep has always nurtured a passion for the culture later chronicled in the lyrics of the song “Hip-Hop My Friend.” “I’ve been a dreamer always. Being an artist is trying to manifest those dreams." says Pep when remembering the journey that has led him to the destination in which we find him today. He connected with close friend and DJ/producer Jay-Biz while in high school, and formed The Shamen, a duo that would later gain recognition for witty raps and mosaic beats under the guise of The Prose. While the tandem would begin working with a collective rap crew known as Hieroglyphics, Pep performed incessantly as a fiercely dedicated Rap argonaut. “We were spending time with each other freestyling, making songs and involved in each other’s lives as artists and friends,” Pep recalls of his high school classmates, including A Plus, Casual, and Opio. “The clique of rapping cats.”

Pep’s precise vocals appear on major-backed albums and 12" singles such as Casual’s Fear Itself and Del the Funky Homosapien’s “Wrong Place At The Wrong Time” (alongside Q-Tip). All the while, Pep was plugging away in the studio and on stage. After Hieroglyphics’ 1997 debut, 3rd Eye Vision was released Pep’s patience and perseverance bared fruit with world tours and unbridled underground exposure. Pep reflects, “I had good reason to keep going, as far as the tours. We were doing stuff we’d never done before. The whole time, I’m trying to do me."

Pep stayed steadfast with the release of his solo debut, Ascension, in 2001. The Hieroglyphics Imperium release became a cult-championed album that struck a galvanizing chord with Hiero fans showcasing Pep’s unique perspective, witty wordplay and braggadocio. “It was really good to have a first record come out. But my music had changed since people had first heard me with Casual. It was a whole different style,” Pep explains. He followed up with Ascension: Side C, and The Foundation mixtape and kept rocking shows with old-school Rap routines and a real DJ while others reduced offerings to iPhone playlists and karaoke sets.

The Hip-Hop ambassador has again advanced his style with recent releases such as 2012’s Rigmarole, which offered a cohesive, deeply personal and passionate artistic triumph. The listening audience was afforded the opportunity to enter into the mind of the lyricist through their own ears and third person perspective. In 2013 Pep paired with fellow Hieroglyphics crew member and partner in rhyme, Opio of Souls Of Mischief, to form the duo First Light with the release of their decadently-themed debut LP Falla¢y Fanta$y. That theme carries into Pep’s upcoming 2014 EP, Dolla Daily. With two handfuls of songs, the Hieroglyphics Imperium release focuses itself on the daily grind of acquisition and the pursuit of happiness through physical pleasure topped with an allegory of spiritual enlightenment with Pep as both MC and producer. Crafting the rhymes and nearly all of the production, Pep compiled several of the songs he’d recently shared individually with his core fans on social media into a mixed and mastered package that speaks to the general concept of the late Summer release’ namesake; Dolla Daily.

As a testament to his skill, and dedication, Pep Love is confident that his art is the freshest. “I love music. This will be the thing that makes my life.” The music speaks for itself and Pep has never shifted even as he as evolved as an artist. So you won’t see Monsieur Love trying to keep up with the Jones’ with any of the genre twisting modernistic antics employed by some of today’s underground Hip-Hop artists . As a matter of fact you should discard the underground or alternative prefixes and just keep the root word: Hip-Hop.